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The Gap Year Blog

Project Blogs - Costa Rica


On Thursday 27th June, Camp Osita was asked to give a presentation on their camera trap project to the guests at a local lodge – Laguna Vista. Four members were fortunate enough to participate, and we were super excited at the prospect of a meal at the lodge (which we were told about after volunteering for it!).

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After pancakes for breakfast, at 6.15 we were ready to get our day started. Our morning was off to a good start before even meeting our guide as we spotted a Coati whilst walking down the road. We met our guide, Christian, at the coconut bar and decided that on our return we would treat ourselves to a coconut as a reward.

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As part of the turtle project, we spent our Sunday helping build a hatchery. The hatchery is used to put turtle eggs that are nested on our beach (Carate). This is to prevent predation and increases the hatchling success rate as the nests are more closely monitored by both the local community of COPROT and the staff and volunteers at Camp Osita.

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With the Olive Ridley nesting season just over the horizon, the community of Carate are working their socks off to get the beaches ready for their arrival. An important part of making the nesting season successful are the hatcheries, where nests that are laid too close to the shoreline are relocated to a safer environment further up the beach.

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Costa Rica, where do I begin? You have been the most incredible adventure. I have learned more than I could have imagined about wildlife and conservation. I have seen some pretty amazing sights, from a puma and an ocelot, to green and olive ridley turtles nesting and hundreds of hatchlings, to tamanduas and kinkajous, to all the manakin species.

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Costa Rica is renowned worldwide for its extremely high biodiversity with many people visiting each year to try and spot animals such as howler monkeys or tapirs in their natural habitat. However, there are also some really incredible species of snake slithering along the forest floor here, and while difficult to find we have been lucky enough to encounter a few of these native reptiles over the past few days.

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12.000 km, this is the distance between the Camp Osita and my home. It was the first time I travelled alone; I was so stressed but also so excited about this trip! I start my experience with a volunteer program in Quepos, we worked in a marine conservation project, so we studied the coral reef and the nudibranchs and involved in shark conservation.

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Hi, I’m Craig and (sadly) only here for 1 week. It was 2018 when I started looking into Frontier Costa Rica at The Big Cats, Primates and Turtles Adventure. Apart from only going to Italy last year, this was my first solo travel holiday, I did all the preparation myself, despite little experience, but thankfully I had the great people from over Christmas and after, to guide me through. In comparison to South Yorkshire, Costa Rica was a huge difference to be around.

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¡Hola! My name is Riri and I am staying in Camp Osita for one month on the climate change project. We do lots of different things on the project. We have a temperature survey on the beach to study the climate change on Playa Carate, Costa Rica.

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Costa Rica, where do I begin? You have been the most incredible adventure. I have learned more than I could have imagined about wildlife and conservation. I have seen some pretty amazing sights, from a puma and an ocelot, to green and olive ridley turtles nesting and hundreds of hatchlings, to tamanduas and kinkajous, to all the manakin species.

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