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The Gap Year Blog

Project Blogs - Madagascar


Nosy Be is the single largest tourist destination in Madagascar and it is the only location with all-inclusive resorts (boasting over 10)

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Madagascar has a unique evolutionary history, largely thanks to its isolated location. This, alongside its varied landscape and climate, have resulted in high levels of biodiversity. The island is home to many endemic species, the best-known of which is the lemur.

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The day starts when the sun rises. Depending on how much of a morning person you are, you can find people doing some yoga, preparing breakfast, or getting everything ready for the day ahead

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In March this year, the Madagascar team joined ‘The Great Nurdle Hunt’ to survey and collect nurdles along the beach. The Hunt is a citizen science project, aiming to get people out onto their beaches to collect data on nurdles.

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When it comes down to important marine ecosystems, coral reefs nearly always take the front page. However, just as important are the mangrove forests.

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I never thought I would dive - I never even wanted to dive in the past - and so I simply told myself it was something I wouldn’t do.

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The mid-point of my time arrived and formed a strong, mixed feeling in my heart of sadness and immense happiness. The sadness would be better described as a melancholic thought of only having half of the time left (three weeks) in this beautiful island. The happiness is pure and satisfactory from all the accomplishments, personal and professional, I have achieved so far.

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The highlight of my trip so far has probably been the visit to Tanikelly, a remote island off Nosy be. Here I got the chance to snorkel amongst the reefs and see lots of different colourful fish, some larger than I expected. I also came to the realisation that I’m not a fan of jellyfish and seeing them heading towards you in the water is less than ideal. The highlight of my day was getting up close and personal with a turtle which is something I’ve always wanted to do!

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The aim of the Frontier Madagascar Marine (MGM) Conservation Research Program is to research the health of the tropical marine ecosystems in the Nosy Vorona Passage, whilst also providing training to volunteers and staff in the scientific methods necessary to conduct surveys.

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I’ve got one week left doing marine conservation in Nosy Be, Madagascar. Throughout my time here I have achieved my advanced open water, been able to learn territorial and schooling fish, and even start to be able to take part in surveys.

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