G+ YouTube Pinterest Instagram
The Gap Year Blog

Project Blogs - Costa Rica


It was a clear morning after four days of constant rain. For the first time in a while, the colectivo would brave the jungle road between Puerto Jiménez and Carate again. It was judged by the locals that it had not rained enough for the different rivers along the way to have decreased in volume and current to be able to ford. So, 6AM on a Wednesday, we set out for Carate.

Click to read more ...

It’s difficult to put into words the experience I have had here at Camp Osita. Everything is so different from life back in London, that to explain it in on would not do it justice, or be able to capture what camp life is truly like.

Click to read more ...

Hi there! My name is Francesca and I am the new Research Officer at Frontier Costa Rica. I have been here for three weeks and it feels like that time has flown by, yet it also feels like I have been here for much longer because I feel so comfortable on camp and so much has happened.

Click to read more ...

I am now 4 weeks into my 8-week stay with Frontier, and am quickly realising why people call it the sands of time. Every week brings new adventures and discoveries, and I am constantly learning new things, giving me an appreciation and understanding of the importance of conservation work. I only wish I could spend more time here! The more than picturesque surroundings combined with minimalistic living provide a perfect distraction from the stresses and monotony of everyday life.

Click to read more ...

There’s something about walking along a star lit beach at midnight in Costa Rica that makes all the troubles of daily life seem very, very small. The glowing bioluminescent sand lighting up every footstep. The calming roar of ocean waves to your right. The buzzing sounds of the jungle to your left. Add to that watching a mother Olive Ridley turtle laying eggs in the sand and “The Circle of Life” might as well be playing in the background.

Click to read more ...

I’m writing this blog in the Collectivo because today is the end of my stay. I’m remembering all the nice moments I had with everyone: when I saw hatchlings for the first time, when we spent the whole evening playing card games, or sometimes just a nice and slow breakfast game, or the fun match of beach volleyball with a nice sunset at the end. There is also the fun time with the locals when they came and taught us how to cook local food.

Click to read more ...

We meandered toward Puerto Jimenez via Stansted, Heathrow, Houston and San Jose airports, with a short hop in a 12-seater Sensa plane from San Jose to Puerto Jimenez where rain halted play.... for two days.

Click to read more ...

Egg predation is a naturally occurring event that partly explains why many turtles don’t make it to the sea. It is approximated that only 1 in 1000-10,000 turtles make it to adulthood. Here in Frontier Costa Rica, we do our part to conserve these amazing marine reptiles by covering new nests with bamboo covers, in an attempt to deter the vultures and local dogs from digging them up and eating the eggs.

Click to read more ...

After an amazing week surveying wildlife in Carate, a group of us took the collectivo to Puerto Jimenez to go on a whale and dolphin watching boat tour around the Golfo Dulce.

Click to read more ...

It was a clear morning after four days of constant rain. For the first time in a while, the colectivo would brave the jungle road between Puerto Jiménez and Carate again.

Click to read more ...

1 / 10 out of 41